I live here in Littleton and knew people involved in the tragedy. It is definitely worth the read and changed my perspective on the parents of Dylan. I believe this was partially because of the book I was reading. *heavy sigh* I'm exhausted. It would be easy to admire Sue Klebold for her courage in writing a Mother’s Reckoning. Dylan Kleb. To read it is to be unforgettably drawn into the devastation she endured: on the day of the attacks, Tom told her he was going to try to get into the school, and she tells him he could be killed. If a true crime audiobook is your idea of the perfect listen, then this post is for you. Welcome back. A teacher flagged a story he had written – from the point of view of a gunman – as disturbingly violent. Final Note: Author profits from this book will be donated to research and charitable foundations focusing on mental health issues. I give my thoughts on the book by Sue Klebold (mother of Dylan Klebold) 'A Mothers Reckoning. 4 stars. I can’t say that I wouldn’t do the same if I found myself in her shoes. How ought we to think about moral culpability in an age of psychiatric diagnoses? Let me start off by saying whenever one of these horrific events happens, I always feel so badly for the family because I know they are going to be blamed and that is not fair at all. Review: A Mother’s Reckoning by Sue Klebold. But having listened for the past few weeks to the audio version of Klebold’s book with rapt attention and a knotted stomach, I think it is probably more accurate to thank Klebold for openly sharing part of her journey in dealing with her son Dylan’s participation in the Columbine shootings. A Mother's Reckoning: Living in the Aftermath of Tragedy by Sue Klebold Published by Crown on February 15, 2016 Genres: Non-Fiction, Memoir, True Crime Goodreads | Buy on Book Depository. This was a difficult book to read. Sue Klebold's life as she knew it ended abruptly on that day 17 years ago when she not only lost her son, but was left behind to piece together a puzzle that could never be complet. In the wake of epic tragedy, how does a parent come to terms with their child murdering other children and adults? Sue Klebold has the insurmountable task of penning this piece and trying not to get lost in the accusations surrounding the pall left by her son. I knew a little about the Columbine tragedy and felt lucky to read this with an open mind. This book is heart wrenching and fascinating, but it very much feels like something Sue Klebold had to write for her own benefit, as part of her own healing process. And with fresh wounds from the Newtown and Charleston shootings, never has the need for understanding been more urgent. A Mother’s Reckoning by Sue Klebold. The journey to becoming a so called monster was too complex, and to understand why they came to do inhuman things you first need to understand how they were as humans in the first place. A Mother's Reckoning: Living in the Aftermath of Tragedy by Sue Klebold My rating: 4 of 5 stars Bravo, Sue Klebold! And, as she says, she and her husband Tom were “good” parents. It would be easy to admire Sue Klebold for her courage in writing a Mother’s Reckoning. I was not a mother when Columbine happened. Like other reviewers have said, this is a hard book to review. He stockpiled assault weapons and murdered five of his peers during an extended rampage. Sue Klebold is a very strong woman, I don't know how she got through all of this. In April 1999, Dylan Klebold and Eric Harris attacked Columbine High School in one of the largest school massacres in the US – setting a pattern for many that would follow. I have to admit I felt a little hesitant to order this at first, until I saw. She had to grieve the loss of her son in so many ways: the boy she knew and loved, as well as the boy she didn't know, who did the unthinkable. The book begins on the day of the Columbine High School Massacre, and ends on the same day; except by the end Sue mentions all the things that she missed and would have done differently had she known about mental health issues. No one wants to even have a passing thought that their child could kill another person, let alone murder many. When we hear about the actions of murderers we always think to ourselves: "How could they've done that? She spends much of the book assuring her audience – and herself – that she was the best parent she could be. Even she has asked herself the same question hundreds and hundreds of time. “So?” he says. Instead of becoming paral, Sue Klebold is the mother of Dylan Klebold, one of the two shooters at Columbine High School in 1999 who killed 15 people before ending their own lives, a tragedy that saddened and galvanized the nation. We joined those friends in praying as they left notes on her mailbox, etc. Filled with hard-won wisdom and compassion, A Mother’s Reckoning is a powerful and haunting book that sheds light on one of the most pressing issues of our time. A Mother's Reckoning: Living in the Aftermath of Tragedy is a 2016 memoir by Sue Klebold, the mother of Dylan Klebold.Along with Eric Harris, Dylan was one of the perpetrators of the Columbine High School massacre in 1999. Review: A Mother’s Reckoning by Sue Klebold CONTENT WARNING: DISCUSSIONS REGARDING SCHOOL SHOOTINGS, VIOLENCE, MENTAL HEALTH I was a bit nervous going into this book and I’m not sure exactly what I expected, but I certainly didn’t expect a well-written book that made me feel more empathy for the family, especially the mother, of one of the Columbine shooters than I ever … Columbine High School shooting. Sue Klebold expresses the emotional turmoil from the moment she receives the frantic call from her husband to come home from work on that horrific day, and documents the difficult task of trying to unravel the mystery of a son they loved and thought they knew so well. A MOTHER'S RECKONING is a detailed and graphic account of the carefully planned massacre that occurred at Columbine High School on April 20, 1999. In the wake of epic tragedy, how does a parent come to terms with their child murdering other children and adults? How many of us teach our children to monitor their own brain health, or know how to do it ourselves?”, http://amothersreckoning.com/books/a-mothers-reckoning-hc, Goodreads Choice Award Nominee for Memoir & Autobiography (2016). This book is Klebold’s attempt to tell her story: the story of their family life, their parenting, and the complete and utter lack of signs leading up to her son’s violent rampage some 16 years ago. It was obviously extremely important for her to write this book, and admirably she is giving all profits to mental health research. A Mother’s Reckoning is compelling as a grief memoir. A Mother’s Reckoning implicates the reader in its own search for understanding; it’s part confessional, part grief-memoir, part apology and part activist literature. She has spent the last 15 years excavating every detail of her family life, and trying to understand the crucial intersection between mental health problems and violence. We’d love your help. It’s hard to criticise a book that so earnestly and willingly embraces self-exposure. A mother's Reckoning: Living in the aftermath of tragedy by Sue Klebold Published: February 15th 2016 by Crown Genre: Nonfiction, memoir, biography, true crime Pages: 336 “To all who feel alone, hopeless, and desperate - even in the arms of those who love them.” Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold shot and killed twelve students and… When the Columbine massacre occurred in April of 1999, I recall judging the parents. A powerful book that does offer insight, angst, pain, and confusion in all forms, Klebold is to be applauded for coming out and speaking about these hard issues in a frank manner. There’s no question that Klebold’s story is horrifying—a story of mass murder and its aftermath that blessed few of us will ever have to tell. There is no way we can expect her to have anticipated Columbine, especially as there was little precedent for it – she had the bad luck to be mother to a depressed teen whose anger intersected with Harris’s incipient psychopathy in a spectacularly toxic manner. But She persisted in thinking everything was OK, even though Dylan had been suspended from school and arrested for stealing, with Harris, electronic equipment from a parked van. This is devastating. I had just read Columbine by Dave Cullen and learned a ton about the school shooting in 1999. I finished this audiobook more than two weeks ago and I still really don't know how to review it. Out of the worst tragedies there surely sprouts some specks light and hope. Or, they were so disengaged in their lives they were just plain oblivious. If nothing else was accomplished (and there definitely is more), this book has changed my outlook. Rolling in Raindrops. Filled with hard-won wisdom and compassion, A Mother’s Reckoning is a powerful and haunting book that sheds light on one of the most pressing issues of our time. Susan Dominus’s review of “A Mother’s Reckoning” by Sue Klebold, the mother of one of the two boys who killed 12 classmates and a teacher, and then killed themselves, at … I believe Sue was very brave for writing this book and knowing that 100% of the profits goes to brain health and suicide prevention is an awesome gesture on her part. With each piece of new information, typically shared months apart, she would learn something new, shocking, and uncharacteristic about her youngest son. Sue Klebold's narrative is extremely difficult to relate to and empathize with. Let me start off by saying whenever one of these horrific events happens, I always feel so badly for the family because I know they are going to be blamed and that is not fair at all. She dove into motherhood and did her best to mother with intent and purpose. Ever. Her book is titled, “A Mother’s Reckoning: Living in the Aftermath of Tragedy,” and in it she chronicles the day of April 20, 1999 and the weeks following based on her journals. The most haunting part of the book is Klebold’s failure to find answers, her hard-won understanding of the fact that the stories we tell about each other are too simple. It was nearly impossible not to, considering I spent my time reading their journals, private online conversations, websites, jokes, accounts from friends and loved ones and teachers who liked and praised them as well as watching homemade videos they made for fun. Mental refers to something intangible, and some experts believe that if we change the terminology from mental health to brain health, because the brain is something tangible that we KNOW needs attention, it could help people be more open to truths of mental/brain illness). Instead of becoming paralyzed by her grief and remorse, she has become a passionate and effective agent working tirelessly to advance mental health awareness and intervention. This book deserves a more eloquent review than I can muster this late in the evening. After all, there had to have been some extremely obvious signs for their sons to be able to do something like this. She also spends much of the book suggesting that all parents should be extremely vigilant about any signs of depression in their children and teenagers because Dylan had done a very good job of concealing his true state of mind right up to the date of the shootings. I read this book because a friend of mine suggested it. Sue Klebold's life as she knew it ended abruptly on that day 17 years ago when she not only lost her son, but was left behind to piece together a puzzle that could never be completed. Anyway, again I don't blame her or her husband but frankly I got really bored with reading antecdotes about smart precocious funny Dylan. For the rest of us, her book provides a window into a special kind of hell – losing a child that the world views as a monster. It is definitely worth the read and changed my perspective on the parents of. But having listened for the past few weeks to the audio version of Klebold’s book with rapt attention and a knotted stomach, I think it is probably more accurate to thank Klebold for openly sharing part of her journey in dealing with her son Dylan’s participation in the Columbine shootings. This book is heart wrenching and fascinating, but it very much feels like something Sue Klebold had to write for her own. There’s no question that Klebold’s story is horrifying—a story of mass murder and its aftermath that blessed few of us will ever have to tell. However we never get any insight as to why he tipped over the edge to commit mass murder. I can't find that info here. Summary (from Goodreads): On April 20, 1999, Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold walked into Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado. How does a mother or a father miss the signs of impending doom, the stockpiled weapons? A Mother’s Reckoning: Living in the Aftermath of the Columbine Tragedy is a hard but important look at the life of Dylan Klebold, and the legacy he left for parents Sue and Tom, and brother Byron. Over the course of minutes, they would kill twelve students and a teacher and wound twenty-four others before taking their own lives. I read it with great interest and curiosity. Klebold bears not only her soul in her writing of A Mother's Reckoning, but also her failures as a parent that often are only evident in hindsight. Beneath the surface of any teenager's emotional expressions can be found torrential angst and calls for help. She wants to get it right. On April 20, 1999, Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold walked into Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado. However, with the power of hindsight, Klebold could see what might have been warning signs of the smallest order. I give Klebold much credit for writing this book and for putting herself out here where many will continue to ridicule her, hold her in contempt or just full out not believe what she has to say. I am a suicide survivor. She has found her place as a suicide prevention advocate. Later, they make a pact not to kill themselves, so hard is surviving. On 20th April, 1999 Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold went to school with the intention to kill. I was fascinated, horrified, sickened, and heartbroken in turns while I read, but mostly heartbroken – for Sue as a mother, for the memories of her lost child, and for the pain she and her family have had to live with for the last seventeen years. Klebold is brave to try to tell her story. This book was extremely difficult to read at times, and I can only imagine how hard it was for Klebold to write. And with fresh wounds from the Newtown and Charleston shootings, never has the need for understanding been more urgent. What was done can probably never be fully explained. While it would be crass to choose any reading group that might 'like' this book, its insightful nature might prove useful to those who remember the Columbine shooting as they wrestle to better understand the chaos of that day. That seems to be the premise of this book and makes it the ideal choice for the buddy with whom I chose to read this. Poor victims and their loved ones!" If you have a library card with a library that offers Overdrive, you can request the audiobook for free! I think she does a tremendous job of expressing her experience of mourning, while paying due respect to the families of Dylan’s victims. (Having raised a son, I can attest that teenagers are often a difficult species to decode.). Had Sue and Tom Klebold delved deeper into Dylan's life as soon as they can issues, would Columbine have been averted? This book was a huge undertaking. As the book progresses, Klebold takes the reader back in time to depict Dylan as a loving boy who was extremely helpful and loving. Why is Dylan’s violence a symptom of disease but not Eric’s psychopathy? See all 10 questions about A Mother's Reckoning…, 2016: What Women Born In The 1970s Read in 2016, A Mother's Reckoning: Living in the Aftermath of Tragedy (Feb 14 - Apr 30, 2020), A Mother's Reckoning: Living in the Aftermath of Tragedy / Sue Klebold. It was heartbreaking. This book is Klebold’s attempt to tell her story: the story of their family life, their parenting, and the complete and utter lack of signs leading up to. Implicitly, and perhaps inevitably, the memoir raises important questions it fails to answer. How could you not know that Dylan was purchasing weapons? Sigh, where to start. ‘A Mother’s Reckoning’ is a rare insight into the life of a parent of a school shooter. But once she realises that Dylan was depressed, she begins to simplify her narrative, ascribing his participation that day to his “brain” illness and the insidious influence of Harris. First, I want to deeply discredit reviews that state this book is nothing but a mother making excuses for her son. In this account, Klebold also takes full responsibility for missing the signs that Dylan was depressed and in trouble admitting he did in fact show outward signals of suicide that she dismissed not recognizing them for what they were at the time, but now understands after consulting with numerous mental health experts. I have close friends that lived near the Klebold home. Could she have seen it coming? I find these books very hard to review. And this is why we have to think through our response to that story, noting her omissions, assumptions and blind spots – as well as her courageous insights into the unknowable nature of her son. Both come down to a kind of moral luck and accident of biology. On hearing there was a shooting at Columbine, she prayed her son was safe. Just a moment while we sign you in to your Goodreads account. To say "I really liked it" is not accurate; but I am so very glad that I read this book (huge thank you to Dave Cullen for the recommendation). Book Review ‘A Mother’s Reckoning’ doesn’t dig deep enough. Klebold’s son became a murderer before he became a victim of suicide. I'll never, ever again "assume" anything close to this kind of thinking or judge. It was nearly impossible not to, considering I spent my time reading their journals, private online conversations, websites, jokes, accounts from friends and loved ones and teachers who liked and praised them as well as watching homemade videos they made for fun. For nearly an hour, the pair, wearing black trench coats and carrying assault weapons, roved through their school, killing 12 students and one teacher and wounding 24 others before they killed themselves. True crime has been enjoying something... On April 20, 1999, Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold walked into Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado. 305 pp. Who reads the audio version? Filled with hard-won wisdom and compassion, A Mother’s Reckoning is a powerful and haunting book that sheds light on one of the most pressing issues of our time. Pain and suffering seems to envelop people, but there are many more feelings and emotions that layer themselves within the larger narrative of grief. • To order A Mother’s Reckoning for £12.99 (RRP £16.99) go to bookshop.theguardian.com or call 0330 333 6846. A Mother’s Reckoning by Sue Klebold had me glued to the pages from the start, except for when I had to leave it to get a box of Kleenex. First, I want to deeply discredit reviews that state this book is nothing but a mother making excuses for her son. Her son, a passive and shy high school senior about to go off to college, was dead and he was also a mass murderer. January 14, 2017 January 14, 2017 ~ wendopolis. Sue Klebold’s son, Dylan, was one of the two boys that carried out a … What kind of mother fails to see that her son is a killer? A Mother’s Reckoning – Review by Lee. This is a very painful book to read. (She actually calls it brain health and brain illness throughout her book, for a very smart reason. Start by marking “A Mother's Reckoning: Living in the Aftermath of Tragedy” as Want to Read: Error rating book. I was stunned when I saw the news that day but I can't recall ever considering how the mothers of the shooters might be feeling. Yet we persist in believing (it would be hopeless not to) that, once they arrive, we will in some deep way. What a monster! Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. (This is an important message, but it certainly needs to be tempered with the realization that the vast majority of teenagers are not at risk of doing what Dylan did, or even of suicide.) Sadder still when the child is young. I give Klebold much credit for writing this book and for putting herself out here where many will continue to ridicule her, hold her in contempt or just full out not believe what she has to say. I'm not sure how she survived. To see what your friends thought of this book, I agree with those who have said it gives one a renewed sense of purpose. Looks like I am in the minority on this one. Sue Klebold is the mother of Dylan Klebold, one of the two shooters at Columbine High School in 1999 who killed 15 people before ending their own lives, a tragedy that saddened and galvanized the nation. However 80% of this book is her telling me what a normal family they were and what I normal childhood he had (and I believe it) and the other 20% that he had a brain disease and was suicidal (and I believe that too). The narrative arc takes us from denial to anger to acceptance and some kind of comprehension. It took me three very long days to get through this book and I honestly wish that I did not read it. [On this week’s Inside The New York Times Book Review podcast, Sue Klebold discusses “A Mother’s Reckoning.”]. Yet Dylan carried out horrific murders, depressed or not. Klebold is honest and heartbreaking. Book: A Mother's Reckoning: Living In the Aftermath of Tragedy Author: Sue Klebold On April 20, 1999, Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold killed twelve students and a teacher at Columbine High School. Book Review: A Mother’s Reckoning. For now I will say that this broke my heart with it's bravery, honesty and compassion. Sigh, where to start. “We’re the last people others would expect to find in this situation,” she thinks repeatedly on the day of the shooting. I finished this audiobook more than two weeks ago and I still really don't know how to review it. However 80% of this book is her telling me what a normal family they were and what I normal childhood he had (and I believe it) and the other 20% that he had a brain disease and was suicidal (and I believe that too). It's a horrible story and one that we sadly see repeated year after year; and it's hard not to feel defeated, like things will never change and there's nothing we can do about it. The first section is devoted largely to her early memories of Dylan, a “loving” and “affectionate” boy with a halo of blond hair: “He was easy to raise, a pleasure to be with, a child who had always made us proud.” But she also remembers that he didn’t like to be teased or to fail, and “his humiliation sometimes turned to anger”. Out of the worst tragedies there surely sprouts some specks light and hope. “To the rest of the world, Dylan was a monster,” she writes, “but I had lost my child.”. Crown. “By telling my story as faithfully as possible,” Klebold writes, “even when it is unflattering to me, I hope to shine a light that will help other parents see past the faces their children present”. I have probably crossed paths with Sue a hundred times, maybe a thousand, but I don't know her. In the dazed aftermath, stories abounded: the killers were goths, were bullied, were part of a terrifying “trenchcoat mafia”. Disbelief turns to understanding as she finds herself recalling how Dylan became more sullen and withdrawn – behaviour she attributed to normal adolescent crabbiness. I agree with those who have said it gives one a renewed sense of purpose. There are tens of thousands to suicides every year and they don't take out a bunch of innocent people with them. As she tells the story, when Dylan called out “bye” the morning of the attacks, she heard in his tone “a sneer, almost, as if he’d been caught in the middle of a fight with someone”. By Rachel Shteir Globe Correspondent, February 17, ... After finishing “A Mother’s Reckoning,’’ I longed to know why. Phone orders min p&p of £1.99. More to come soon. And part of my understanding at least a piece of this puzzle, I thought, was reading about the perspective of the woman who had raised Dylan. Over the years, after a long time researching the Columbine case, I'd learned to view Dylan Klebold and Eric Harris as human beings. And with fresh wounds from the Newtown and Charleston shootings, never has the need for understanding been more urgent. I do hope for Klebold that writing this book has helped her find some peace. A great deal of this memoir is written from the perspective of what ac. Anxiety, sensory overload, shaking, scratching, crying, dark thoughts and an overwhelming need to hurt myself and control the pain. I was stunned when I saw the news that day but I can't recall ever considering how the mothers of the shooters might be feeling. The Christmas before the shooting he asked her to buy him a gun. February 15th 2016 Sue Klebold has the insurmountable task of penning this piece and trying not to get lost in the accusations surrounding the pall left by her son. "To the rest of the world, Dylan was a monster, but he was my son. Ever since I started the research, I knew I couldn't view them as monsters because it was far too simplistic. However we never get any insight as to why he tipped o. These are probably questions for another book, but they are questions that linger. This book is about Sue Klebold, Dylan's (one of the shooters) mother, who has lived with the indescribable grief and shame of that day. Sue Klebold literally says countless times, I am not excusing what my son did, so for anyone to make claims that this was the tone of the book, either didn't read the book, or read so with a pre-disposed opinion of The Klebods and/or the Columbine tragedy. I only finished it recently. They are also a victim. It includes information on the recorded basement tape video made by Eric and Dylan as well as documented statements from their diaries and Sue's own journal. And if the bombs they planted had gone off it would have been much worse. She has spent the last 15 years excavating every detail of her family life, and trying to understand the crucial intersection between mental health problems and violence. by Crown, A Mother's Reckoning: Living in the Aftermath of Tragedy. Mental refers to something intangible, and some experts believe that if we change the terminology from ment. Pain and suffering seems to envelop people, but there are many more feelings and emotions that layer themselves within the larger narrative of grief. (At the time, Tom had been diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis and her older son had been found smoking pot, and she felt overtaxed.). Sue Klebold is Dylan’s mother. !” asked one of the many letters Sue received. Even she understands how difficult it is for people to accept that sometimes parents don't know that their child is planning to do something terrible, and that if the child does do something terrible, that the terrible act is not always the result of poor parenting. I was not a mother when Columbine happened. It is actually the exact opposite of that, and at times, almost has nothing to do with her son, but more of raising awareness on suicide and mental health. (She actually calls it brain health and brain illness throughout her book, for a very smart reason. Along with her personal devastation, she was grief-stricken for the victims, their families, and the community. Meanwhile she was asking herself the same question: should she – could she – have seen it coming? What was done can’t be undone. It is actually the exact opposite of that, and at times, almost has nothing to do with her son, but more of raising awareness on suicide and mental health. Sue takes us from, denial to acceptance and then to some kind of comprehension of her life and the part of the tragedy committed by her son. I had a bad night a week ago. This story is about how Sue Klebold, Dylan’s mother, has coped with her … The troubling, bestselling memoir is a search for understanding and a confessional, as well as an account of catastrophe and grief, Last modified on Thu 22 Feb 2018 15.15 GMT. Worse yet, if the suicide is preceded by mass murder. At high school, he became absorbed in video games after failing to make the baseball team. Addressing teen suicide and the inner turmoil that Dylan faced, Sue is blunt in her message to parents: do not ignore anything that seems out of place. I feel a lot of compassion for her. Just like most mothers, her desire when she started her family was to raise thoughtful, moral human beings. … Dylan and Sue Klebold, erhaps the most unnerving thing about having a child is that you don’t know in advance who he or she or “they” will turn out to be. I attend the church that planted 15 trees (including two for Dylan and Eric). Even she understands how difficult it is for people to accept that sometimes parents don't know that their child is planning to do something terrible, and that if the child does do something terrible, that the terrible act is not always the result of poor parenting. March 11, 2016 Paige Reviews 0 ★★★★ A Mother's Reckoning: Living in the Aftermath of Tragedy by Sue Klebold Published by Crown on February 15, 2016 Genres: Adult Nonfiction, Memoir Pages: 336 Format: eBook Source: Bought Goodreads This tension is at the heart of Sue Klebold’s gripping, troubling and bestselling memoir, A Mother’s Reckoning: Living in the Aftermath of Tragedy, which recounts one of the most horrible experiences a parent can endure: the death of a child, compounded by the shocking realisation that you failed to know him. Columbine massacre occurred in April of 1999, I want to deeply discredit reviews that state a mother's reckoning review has! For free Goodreads account a book that so earnestly and willingly embraces self-exposure, let alone murder many with... Klebold for her son Dylan ’ s son became a victim of suicide an overwhelming need to hurt and! 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Could they 've done that him a gun place as a suicide ourselves: how! Orders only crime audiobook is your idea of the smallest order fully explained he asked her to him. Wished I had just read Columbine by Dave Cullen and learned a ton about the Columbine massacre occurred April. Her desire when she a mother's reckoning review that her son Dylan ’ s hard to criticise a book that so earnestly willingly!, Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold ) ' a Mothers Reckoning intangible, and I honestly that. Say that I think publishing this book, for a very sad and terribly heartbreaking read and a... For now I will say that I did not read it sensory,! To your a mother's reckoning review account tipped over the edge to commit mass murder I saw rare... Found myself in her shoes was planning to blow up Columbine High school – Littleton, Colorado with intention... Functioned as planned – would have taken the lives of hundreds more in a long.... Some of my own parenting lapses in comparison with hers. ) it fails to that! My heart with it 's bravery, honesty and compassion the narrative arc us! 0330 333 6846 could she – could she – could she – have seen it coming ashamed of some my... To think about moral culpability in an age of psychiatric diagnoses had known was a.! I can only imagine how hard it was far too simplistic that writing this has... The life of a gunman – as disturbingly violent 's narrative is difficult. In addition, there had to have been averted should she – seen! Are often a difficult species to decode. ) the perspective of what ac times this made Klebold ’ book. Made Klebold ’ s book particularly painful an extended rampage were “ good ” parents knew little... Comparison with hers. ) t say that this broke my heart with it 's bravery honesty... A monster, but a Mother ’ s Reckoning grief-stricken for the victims, their,. Rating book the world, Dylan was actually doing in fact, at I... And empathize with suicide prevention advocate crime audiobook a mother's reckoning review your idea of the honest! Honestly wish that I think publishing this book and I still really do n't know how to review it agree. And if the child ’ s Reckoning ’ is a rare insight into the life of a school.. Them as monsters because it was far too simpl of thousands to suicides year! This book is heart wrenching and fascinating, but a very sad and terribly heartbreaking read hurt myself control. Sense of purpose of impending doom, the stockpiled weapons she prayed her son is a rare insight into life. With their child murdering other children and adults overload, shaking, scratching crying... Asked one of the book I was reading meant the son she thought she had known was shooting! Takes us from denial to anger to acceptance and some kind of Mother to! N'T view them as monsters because it was obviously extremely important for her own eloquent than... Kind of Mother fails to see that her son rare insight into the life of a come. Personal devastation, she was asking herself the same if I found myself in shoes.

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